Posts Tagged cansecwest

Tickle! See? Gee, I …

A montage of TCL and Tcl-related logos

Tcl/Tk

Ah, TCL, the Tool Command Language. Based on the research conducted by myself and my colleagues here at Security Objectives (most notably Shane Macaulay,) we have concluded that Tcl has a multitude of security issues, especially when being used in a network environment; and contemporarily speaking, network usage is almost unavoidable. In essence, we are urging the use of extreme caution in Tcl-based web development–whether it’s being used directly or indirectly. To generalize, we also advise against using Tcl for any network application or protocol (not just HTTP.) Security Objectives has published an in-depth analysis of practical Tcl vulnerabilities. The whitepaper, entitled “Tickling CGI Problems”, outlines the theoretical backbone of the phenomena in the first half and presents cases of real-world exploitation in the second half. However, the background theory along with some general programming and Hyper-Text Transfer Protocol knowledge is recommended in order to gain a firm understanding of the exploits themselves.

This is not to say that Tcl should not be used ever, so as a disclaimer we are not advocating any programming language over another.  Our position is that the traditional approach to web security with Tcl has much room for improvement. Like any other programming language it works nicely in certain areas such as academic research, scientific computing, extensions, and software testing. With that being said, one project that comes to mind is regfuzz, a regular expression fuzzer written in Tcl which is quite useful. The distinction here is that regfuzz is not intended to be exposed to a public (or even a private) network. Surely, Safe-Tcl could successfully serve network clients in a hardened production environment given that assessed risks were rated low enough to suffice as acceptable. The problem is, that’s not the type of operations that occur in practice as evidenced by an overwhelming majority of cases.

The vulnerabilities exposed by the whitepaper affect TclHttpd, Lyris List Manager, cgi.tcl (which also uses Expect) as well as the Tcl language itself and interpreters thereof. Some of the attack methodologies and vulnerabilities identified are new to the public. Others are similar to well-known attacks or simply subversions of previous security patches, e.g. CVE-2005-4147. As time unfolds, there will surely be a surge in publicized Tcl weaknesses due to the research which is elaborated on within the whitepaper. If you’re interested in discovering vulnerabilities in Tcl software yourself, then there’s a grand list of references to Tcl-related things at http://www.tcl.tk/resource_dump.html. There is also a USENET newsgroup dedicated to it which is naturally called comp.lang.tcl.

For those of you attending CanSecWest 2011 in Vancouver, we are sponsoring the event. Professionals from Security Objectives will be in attendance to answer your queries regarding Tcl/Tk security or other areas of specialized research (information assurance, software assurance, cloud security, etc.) Of course, our professionals will also be available to field questions regarding Security Objectives’ product and service offerings as well. In addition, CanSecWest 2011 attendees receive special treatment when purchasing licenses for BlockWatch, the complete solution to total cloud security.

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The Philosophical Future of Digital Immunization

digital-trojan-horse-viriiUsually it’s difficult for me to make a correlation between the two primary subjects that I studied in college–computer science and philosophy. The first few things that pop into mind when attempting to relate the two are typically artificial intelligence and ethics. Lately, intuition has caused me to ponder over a direct link between modern philosophy and effective digital security.

More precisely, I’ve been applying the Hegelian dialectic to the contemporary signature-based approach to anti-virus while pontificating with my peers on immediate results; the extended repercussions of this application are even more fascinating. Some of my thoughts on this subject were inspired by assertions of Andrew Jacquith and Dr. Daniel Geer at the Source Boston 2008 security conference. Mr. Geer painted a beautiful analogy between the direction of digital security systems and the natural evolution of biological autoimmune systems during his keynote speech. Mr. Jacquith stated the current functional downfalls of major anti-virus offerings. These two notions became the catalysts for the theoretical reasoning and practical applications I’m about to describe.

Hegel’s dialectic is an explicit formulation of a pattern that tends to occur in progressive ideas. Now bear with me here–In essence, it states that for a given action, an inverse reaction will occur and subsequently the favorable traits of both the action and reaction will be combined; then the process starts over. A shorter way to put it is: thesis, antithesis, synthesis. Note that an antithesis can follow a synthesis and this is what creates the loop. This dialectic is a logical characterization of why great artists are eventually considered revolutionary despite  initial ridicule for rebelling against the norm. When this dialectic is applied to anti-virus, we have: blacklist, whitelist, hybrid mixed-mode. Anti-virus signature databases are a form of blacklisting. Projects such as AFOSI md5deep, NIST NSRL,  and Security Objectives Pass The Hash are all whitelisting technologies.

A successful hybrid application of these remains to be seen since the antithesis (whitelisting) is still a relatively new security technology that isn’t utilized as often as it should be. A black/white-list combo that utilizes chunking for both is the next logical step for future security software. When I say hybrid mixed-mode, I don’t mean running a whitelisting anti-malware tool and traditional anti-virus in tandem although that is an attractive option. A true synthesis would involve an entirely new solution that inherited the best of each parent approach, similar to a mule’s strength and size. The drawbacks of blacklists and whitelists are insecurity and inconvenience, respectively. These and other disadvantages are destined for mitigation with a hybridizing synthesis.

The real problem with mainstream anti-virus software is that it’s not stopping all of the structural variations in malware. PC’s continue to contract virii even when they’re loaded with all the latest anti-virus signatures. This is analogous to a biological virus that becomes resistant to a vaccine through mutation. Signature-based matching was effective for many years but now the total set of malicious code far outweighs legitimate code. To compensate, contemporary anti-virus has been going against Ockham’s Razor by becoming too complex and compounding the problem as a result. It’s time for the security industry to make a long overdue about-face. Keep in mind that I’m not suggesting that there be a defection of current anti-virus software. It does serve a purpose and will become part of the synthesization I show above.

The fundamental change in motivation for digital offensive maneuvers from hobbyist to monetary and geopolitical warrants a paradigm shift in defensive countermeasure implementation. For what it’s worth, I am convinced that the aforementioned technique of whitelisting chunked hashes will be an invaluable force for securing the cloud. It will allow tailored information, metrics and visualizations to be targeted towards various domain-specific applications and veriticals. For example: finance, energy, government, or law enforcement, as well as the associated software inventory and asset management tasks of each. Our Clone Wars presentation featuring Pass The Hash (PTH) at Source Boston and CanSecWest will elaborate on our past few blog posts and much more.. See you there!

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Ignorance is Bliss

Ignorance is Bliss When you think about it, time really is all we have. It’s what you have at your disposal, to do anything and everything. It seems that we’re better off not knowing when it comes to security–for our own good. Can it really be so utilitarian?

To anybody out there writing exploits: make sure you’re doing it just for fun. Currently, there are no outlets for any financial gain that will accurately measure your time investment or fairly compensate your hard work.

Security Objectives’ own Shane Macaulay “owned” Vista SP1 in the PWN2OWN contest at CanSecWest 2008 by exploiting a bug in Adobe Flash. As a result of the contest’s categorization of the bug as third-party, the exploit was grossly under-appraised (especially when considering cross-platform targets and the fact that it would work well into the future with Vista’s new Service Pack.) Sure, it technically was a bug in a third-party application, but this particular third-party application happens to be installed on just about every Internet-enabled PC. According to Adobe, “Adobe® Flash® Player is the world’s most pervasive software platform, used by over 2 million professionals and reaching over 98% of Internet-enabled desktops in mature markets as well as a wide range of devices.”

Even if Shane was unfairly compensated, it doesn’t matter because at least he used “responsible disclosure” — or does it? I highly doubt that the people in charge of the companies writing buggy software and brokering bug information have any idea about the amount of work and skill that goes into discovering an exploitable bug, let alone writing a proof-of-concept for it. As it stands, software companies are setting themselves up for a black market in digital weapons trading of unprecedented proportions.

Here’s something else to think about.. I expect Adobe to patch this one rather quickly given all the publicity. How long does it take for a vendor to fix a given vulnerability when it is reported to them directly? Even some of the brokered “upcoming advisories” on 3Com’s ZDI site are many months or even years stale. This “patchtile dysfunction” will increase the value of a 0-day exploit exponentially.

Time is money and to make up for lost time, Mr. Macaulay decided to sell the laptop he had won on eBay. An innocent bystander at the contest dubbed this decision “from pwn to pawn.” So why not? Laptops get sold on eBay everyday–but not this one. It wasn’t long before eBay pulled Mr. Macaulay’s item from auction on the first of April, ostensibly as an April Fool’s shenanigan. This came as a surprise to me. Things to consider here:

  • The laptop may or may not have had forensic evidence of the controlled attack that occurred during the contest.
  • Even so, Mr. Macaulay is a responsible discloser and would not have shipped the laptop until the bug was patched.
  • Mr. Macaulay’s and Mr. Sotirov’s autographs should have increased the laptop value, regardless.

This incident, in a way, reminded me of eBay’s great fearwall debacle from a few years ago (CVE-2005-4131.) In that case, there were several key differences: an information broker such as ZDI was not involved, a pseudonym was being used, the code statements where the memory corruption occurred were disclosed, and no computer hardware was for sale. Nevertheless, I respect eBay’s decision to discontinue the auction as this is obviously a very controversial issue.

Brokering information? How can you do it? From experience, the idea of using an escrow service and 3rd party verification is largely ineffective. It would appear that ZDI is the only show in town. Of course there’s that auction service, but you have to send them your exploit first so how does that work? It appears that they’re still trying to do business by the way, despite alleged legal troubles. I’m subscribed to their mailing list and they send out an e-mail every time new information goes up for auction; they put up a dozen or so new exploits last week but it would appear that few if any were sold. Where do we go from here? Is brokering information even possible?

Imagine for a moment a scenario where a dozen or so exploits of critical severity related to a single software company are posted to Full Disclosure with rumors of many more circulating in the underground and exploits actively being carried out in the wild. Now imagine shareholders shorting that company’s stock. I suppose that the vulnerability information might be more realistically valued in a situation such as this. Anyone have any other ideas?

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